Weekly photo challenge: A face in the crowd – a true story

Don’t blame me for not having photographed the crowd around us. The most important thing was this man.

Some months ago I decided to fly to Kefalonia. I don’t know why, but it is very difficult to get there from Hamburg and I know nearly all airports in Europe now. This time I had to fly via Gatwick/London. I took the last flight in the night from Hamburg to Gatwick and arrived there around 23.00 h. Gatwick is really huge and has one Southern and one Northern airport. I took the train to the Southern airport. Gatwick is not really a cozy place to spend the night. Even at night a lot of people are roaming around with their luggage, workers are repairing things and policemen with dogs are looking for I don’t know what. One of the dogs was very interested in my cheese sandwich. I wasn’t afraid to be there at night, the security was perfect, but I needed a little calm corner to rest a little. Gatwick only has very, very few seats. I was lucky to find a bench with 4 seats for myself.

Hundreds of people were passing by, a whole crowd. Suddenly I saw a tanned guy coming close to me. He moved with crutches, but was a very impressive appearance. He was tall, slim, about my age and had dreadlocks which were partly covered by a typical cap in the colors of the Jamaican flag. Further he had a cloth bag with likeness of Hailee Selassie the former emperor of Abyssinia who is an idol of the Rastafarians. His long and slender hands were very clean and he had a wonderful golden ring like a lion’s head. Selassie was also known as the lion of Zion.

His face didn’t show the smallest sign of malignity. He had very honest, kind and benevolent brown eyes.

We started to chat immediately and I didn’t expect to spend such a wonderful night on a bench with this man. He told me that he came from Liverpool and was on his way to Jamaica. In Liverpool he was a bee-keeper and earned with his honey 1.500 Pounds in a year, which he needed for the ticket to fly home. In Jamaica he was an organic farmer and grew mangos and guavas. He was very proud of all his organic fruits and vegetables and his healthy life. He completely detested the deceptive practices of the Monsanto Company.

He had a bag of cashew-nuts and some raisins with him and offered them to me. I offered him a cookie which somehow disappeared. I guess it was not healthy enough. Honey was his remedy for everything. He borrowed me a book that showed what you can do with honey against dandruff up to impotence. He must have taken a lot of honey because – believe it or not – he had 19 kids. Anyway whatever illness you have, it was recommended to take 3 spoons full of honey, one spoon full of apple vinegar and some cinnamon. Well, if you don’t want to have 19 kids, don’t try it out.

Anyway I found out quickly that this guy was a real do-gooder with a very high Christian moral. He said, if somebody does you wrong you should do him good because everything bad you do will come back to you. He sometimes started to speak in Jamaican dialect which was hard for me to understand, but somehow very funny when he said “dis ding” instead of this thing. I was very tired, but I enjoyed listening to him. Sometimes when I said something he appreciated, he put his fist to mine and said something like “Yo man”. I must admit that he was not only a very, very nice, honest, kind and generous person, he was funny, too. The hours we spent together were flying quickly, he even told me his name, but I didn’t understand it and therefore I will always remember him as the Rastafari man with the best soul I have ever found in a human person. Somehow I was in euphoria because it was so exhilarating to meet such a wonderful man in times like these. The world would be a better place if a lot of much richer people would have just a little piece of his goodness. I really thought that I had met an angel in human form. I am still overwhelmed when I think about him; he gave me the best hours of my life in the last time. I hope he’s fine and I wish him a lot of luck, and he shouldn’t eat too much honey J  We shook hands and parted as friends. I was really sad that I had to leave.

It was really a remarkable coincidence that I just met this nice guy on a huge airport. Did you ever meet somebody like this? Tell me.

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Serendipity – snapshots

Walking and roaming through Argostoli and Lixouri/Kefalonia always gives me a lot of inspirations. I’m an observer and see a lot of things and details others don’t see. All my antennas are out when I’m roaming around and I always find a lot of strange, funny, crazy, sad, weird or beautiful things that I want to show you here, be it a cat waiting at the harbor for a share of  fish, be it a dead cockroach that looks quite innocent and even graceful in death and which would have made me scream if it would have crawled around, be it a cactus outside of a hairdresser shop, be it the wonderful sprayed picture of an old Indian on the backwheel of a motorbike, be it a beautiful exotic unknown flower, be it an effigy, be it a blooming cactus in a backyard, be it an adorned trunk in front of a library, be it a snake somebody had formed out of sand, be it a tourist that gave some love to a stray cat before the ferry arrived, be it a war memorial with two cannons, be it some very old columns outside of churches that have withstood the earthquakes, be it a fisherman with a first customer etc. All these are snapshots from Kefalonia, my island in the sun.

 

Fleamarket – Old dolls

I love to visit flea markets, and that’s what I do regularly every Sunday morning very early. Whenever I see cute old dolls I photograph them. They all have different personalities, i.e. they have human similarities, different characters and attributes. Some are more baby-like, some are a bit more grown-up, some smile, some have dimples, some have sleeping eyes, some have long or short hair etc. I especially like the very old dolls with porcelain heads and beautiful dresses. I am really fascinated by the variety of dolls I have found in the last years and would like to show them to you.

When the last roses are blooming…

 

When the last roses are blooming in withering colors and their buds don’t dare to unfurl anymore, the world is slowly getting sad and grey, and my heart is filled with wistfulness as if a witch had pulled a night blue veil over my head. Summer gives a feeling of eternity, but autumn and winter a feeling of decay and death which weighs heavily on my heart.

Bright colors are leaving the earth like the God of the sun is drifting away in his carriage to give place to the moon and the darkness.

The sun loses its brightness and lightness and gives a melancholic touch to the earth. Dew drops are clinging at rose petals like my tears for the gone summer. The colors of decay adorn nature with resentment and opaqueness – a beauty in decay.

I photographed these last roses in Kefalonia in our landlord’s garden.

The Goddess of Dawn

EOS – the Goddess of dawn

When I woke-up the last morning in Kefalonia, it was still completely dark and calm outside. After a short while a very faint blueish light appeared behind the stark mountains and let them look like huge paper-cuts. Some minutes later the mountains were slightly illuminated from behind in a tender salmon color, and then the sky changed from minute to minute, getting more and more beautiful, colorful and impressive. I took out my camera to photograph one of the most spectacular sunrises I have ever seen. It seemed as if this was a goodbye-present from my island. It was really the divine birth of a new day.

I remembered that the old Greeks had a lot of Gods and Goddesses like Artemis, the Goddess of hunt, Hermes, the God of thieves, commerce and travelers,  Dionysos, the God of wine and ecstasy, Nyx, the Goddess of night, Selene, the Goddess of the Moon and Helios, the God of the sun.  They were not infallible like our Gods nowadays; they had very human character attributes: they were cruel, they had love affairs, they started wars etc.

The old Greeks had a Goddess of dawn, too, named Eos, and she was supposed to wear a tiara out of rubies. That’s what I saw at this moment. It was overwhelming.

Eos was the sister of Selene (moon) and Helios (sun). What a nice family.

Eos‘  throne stood at the spring of river Oceanus. With her horses and carriage she appeared every morning out of river Oceanus. She drove in front of her brother Helios (the God of the sun) with her own carriage when he travelled heaven’s tent from morning to evening after she disappeared.

She was supposed to be very graceful, beautiful, had curly hair, rosy arms and fingers and a saffron-colored dress (according to Homer).

Once Eos had a love affair with Ares, the God of war. Aphrodite (the Goddess of love) was very angry about her and took vengeance by giving Eos an insatiable demand for young men. Since that time she had to look for young men on her way across the firmament. This made her blush, and the sky blushed, too. She was said to have had a lot of love-affairs…  I must admit I really fell in love with these nice allegories and mythologies because they were very logical, vivid and metaphorical.

I guess, this morning Eos had found a very attractive young man and she blushed a lot. I wish I had seen him, too.

Views of decay – Kefalonia/ Greece

I don’t know why I’m so attracted by decay but for me it has even more beautiful colors and transfers more feelings than new and modern things. All these old things have some kind of a soul, a story to tell, a history; they have been used in good and in bad times and that’s noticeable. People have vanished without a trace but some old things are still there to tell their stories. The music that would fit these photos would be the blues because some of these photos are very blue, but still very honest. These old things don’t pretend to be new or young like some people, they just show their “wrinkles”, having gone through sun and rain, storm or even earthquakes, and I feel respect for every year they have lived, endured and enjoyed their lifetime – if one can say so about objects.